Excavation in southern Poland reveals a Neolithic mass grave

A rescue dig in Sandomierz in South-western Poland revealed a mass grave dated to 2500 BC. Archaeologists discovered incomplete remains of over a dozen dismembered individuals. Specialists working under supervision of archaeologist Monika Bajka, noticed that the remains were not put in anatomical order but were piled up next to and on top of each other. Bones of forearms, feet and portions of the spine were placed separately and femur bones were still placed in the acetabulum of pelvises.

Mass grave found in Sandomierz (by M. Bajka)
Mass grave found in Sandomierz (by M. Bajka)

The bones were probably stored at a different place prior to being buried in this rectangular pit. Among the remains jewellery made of copper rings were discovered, some of which were noticeable only in form of green oxidised spots on several skulls. Copper was an extremely valuable material and is very seldom found in graves dated to the Neolithic. According to archaeologists the grave can be attributed to the Złocka Culture, which was local to the Sandomierska Highland region in the Neolithic Age.

Excavations at the site (by M. Bajka)
Excavations at the site (by M. Bajka)

(after Nauka w Polsce & M. Bajka)

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