Iron Age burials discovered in Dorset

Nine Iron Age skeletons were uncovered during excavations at a pre-Roman town near Winterborne Kingston in Dorset, United Kingdom. The find is significant due to the fact that most tribes of that time cremated or put bodies in wetlands. The skeletons were uncovered along with one Roman grave in a late Iron Age cemetery during an annual 26-day archaeological field school dig by university students.

Archaeologist uncovering one of the burials (by BBC News)
Archaeologist uncovering one of the burials (by BBC News)

The individuals were all found in a coiled up position, similar to a foetal position, in a series of oval pits. Some were found buried with joints of meat and pots which would have contained a drink, showing they believed in life after death.

One of the discovered burials (by BBC News)
One of the discovered burials (by BBC News)
One of the discovered burials (by BBC News)
One of the discovered burials (by BBC News)

The skeletons have been taken to the Bournemouth University to be examined further through DNA and isotope analysis. It is hoped that these tests will reveal he ages, health, diet, origin and cause of death of the people.

The site of excavations (by BBC News)
The site of excavations (by BBC News)

The excavation also revealed a late or post Roman farming settlement, made up of five buildings along with kilns and ovens, established around 300-450 AD. Within that settlements, between 300-400 roundhouses have been located.

Aerial view of the site (by BBC News)
Aerial view of the site (by BBC News)

(after BBC News)

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