Numerous finds at a large construction site

Archaeological studies of the Lithuanian square (Plac Litewski) in Lublin, East Poland revealed numerous Medieval structures and finds from more recent times. The research is a part of a larger reconstruction project of the area. Among the finds are burials, various architectural structures and fortifications.

Remains of architecture found at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Remains of architecture found at the site (by Lublin112.pl)

The discovered cemetery is said to functioned between half of  17th and end of 18th century by the church of the Brothers Hospitallers of Saint John of God. The burial ground covered 200 square metres with new graves being dug in the places of the old ones, sometimes with different orientation. Some graves were partially disturbed while others were untouched.

Graves at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Graves at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Inhumations discovered during excavations (by Lublin112.pl)
Inhumations discovered during excavations (by Lublin112.pl)

The burials were equipped with few personal belongings. In two cases traces of wooden coffins were documented. Coins struck in the times of the Jagiellonian dynasty are among the most common finds from the site. One of the graves contained a golden coin of Matthias I Corvinus, king of Hungary and Croatia, struck at Nagybanya (modern Baia Mare in Romania). Other coins were struck in the time of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, including ones struck during reign of king John II Casimir Vasa, and Prussian coins dated to 1680.

Burials at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Burials at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Skeletons discovered at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Skeletons discovered at the site (by Lublin112.pl)

The excavations revealed also personal scapulars, lockets, crosses, an amber necklace and pendants with beads made of wood and bone. One of the most valuable finds is a double-sided scapular with ornaments painted on tin. One side depicts the Black Madonna of Częstochowa, while the other Saint Francis of Assisi.

Various finds (by Lublin112.pl)
Various finds (by Lublin112.pl)

Architectural remains include among others wooden constructions in the vicinity of the modern fountain. They might have served as workshops. One particular workshop, established in Late Medieval times might have been a place of processing deer antlers. Other wooden construction might have been sanitary channel, dated back to 17th century.

Relics of structures found at the site (by Lublin112.pl)
Relics of structures found at the site (by Lublin112.pl)

Traces of constructions along the Krakowskie Przedmieście street were discovered, being part of the contemporary tract to Wieniawa, now one of Lublin’s districts. Archaeologists also discovered the outline of a 4 metre deep and 11-12 metre wide moat that was part of the city’s fortifications.

The excavation site (by Lublin112.pl)
The excavation site (by Lublin112.pl)

(after Lublin112.pl)

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