2000-year-old fortifications revealed in Crimea

Archaeologists discovered ancient Greek fortifications in the Kerch peninsula at Russian occupied Crimea. The structure belonged to the Bosporan Kingdom, that occupied the area 2000 years ago. The discovery was made near the village of Gornostayevka, about 15 kilometres west of city of Kerch. The excavations were an initial part of gas pipeline construction, linking mainland Russia with Crimea.

Excavations at the site (by Vesti)
Excavations at the site (by Vesti)

Excavations revealed a rampart dated to the early 3rd century BC that was later fortified with watchtowers in the 1st century AD, during the reign of king Asander. The structure protected the capital of the Kingdom, Panticapaeum (present-day Kerch), from the nomadic Scythians. The city is said to be the third largest city in the ancient Greek world.

Ancient fortifications (by Vesti)
Ancient fortifications (by Vesti)

Archaeologists also discovered a well-preserved antique stone tower and an ancient farmstead containing numerous artefacts, to the east of the tower. Other archaeological finds from the site include graves, among which an ancient woman’s tomb was discovered. The buried was equipped with a pitcher and plate, a bronze mirror, beads and earrings.

Excavations at the site (by Vesti)
Excavations at the site (by Vesti)

(after Russia Beyond the Headlines & Vesti)

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