Excavation at the estate of father of USA’s constitution

Archaeologists uncovered the final piece of long-lost part of the estate’s past as the excavations at James Madison’s estate continue. The Montpellier estate in Orange County, West Virginia, USA, was the estate that belonged to Madison, known for drafting the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights and becoming the 4th president of the country. The excavations revealed the foundation of the North Dwelling, a structure that existed in the South Yard of the president’s estate.

Excavations at the estate (by NBC29)
Excavations at the estate (by NBC29)

The South Yard of Montpelier was home to around 100 enslaved workers during Madison’s life. The excavations started with finding scattered bricks and a beautiful chimney base, which suggested a building stood at the place. The North Dwelling is the last of six living quarters known to exist in the South Yard. The other two dwellings that were found in this area, called “double quarters”, were equipped with central chimneys and two rooms on either side. The newly found building is a different architectural style, as it’s a single room structure with a chimney on the end.

Excavations at the estate (by NBC29)
Excavations at the estate (by NBC29)

(after NBC29)

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