Excavation in Manchester reveals a 200-year-old pub with intact brandy

Archaeological research prior to construction works at a site in Manchester, United Kingdom, discovered 200-year-old remains of a pub. The place was once called the Astley Arms and the researchers discovered contained intact bottles of brandy in its remains.

Site of excavations (by Manchester Evening News)
Site of excavations (by Manchester Evening News)

The experts discovered the remains of a pub with several adjacent domiciles. Among the numerous finds are remains of alcohol bottles and personalized ceramic dishes bearing the landlord’s name, Thomas Evans, and the name of the pub written on it – it must have been a commissioned piece for the pub. The buildings are dated to 1800s, when Manchester was still a humble commercial hub.

Artefacts from the excavations (by Manchester Evening News)
Artefacts from the excavations (by Manchester Evening News)

Over 20 bottles are said to have been found, of which three or four were full of brandy. Upon opening a cork the archaeologists could still smell the alcohol. The Astley Arms pub was re-branded the Paganini Tavern in 1840. In the 1850s, the name reverted to the Astley Arms. It stayed open until 1928 as a Cornbrook house. The building was partly rebuilt in 1986, but later razed.

Finds from the site (by Manchester Evening News)
Finds from the site (by Manchester Evening News)

The fate of the 200-year-old brandy remains unknown.

(after Red Orbit & Manchester Evening News)

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