Excavation prior to construction of a transport hub reveals thousands of artefacts

Excavations in Lincoln, East United Kingdom, at the site of a bus station that’s been demolished to build a modern transport hub revealed thousands of artefacts revealing remains of the city’s past.

Excavations at Lincoln (by Lincolnshire Echo)
Excavations at Lincoln (by Lincolnshire Echo)

The new discoveries range from the walls of an old brewery to evidence of a medieval dumping ground. Numerous pieces of everyday green glazed pottery were unearthed, as well as cooking vessels, animal bones, wild boar tusks to stone and ceramic roof tiles. Also, walls and a well belonging to the city’s 19th century Crown Brewery, which manufactured ale and beer, were discovered.

View at the excavation site (by Lincolnshire Echo)
View at the excavation site (by Lincolnshire Echo)

The brewery originally had been owned by George Smith, but was rebuilt on a vast scale in 1856 when it was renamed the Crown Brewery. Archaeologists also uncovered evidence that southern part of the site was little more that bog and Medieval inhabitants of the city were making efforts to reclaim and make use of the land.

Walls of presumed 19th century crown brewery (by Lincolnshire Echo)
Walls of presumed 19th century crown brewery (by Lincolnshire Echo)

(after Lincolnshire Echo)

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