Excavations at Dublin’s Hellfire Club reveal Neolithic engravings

As the archaeological research at the Neolithic passage tomb at Montpelier Hill in Dublin, Ireland, continue a major discovery was made as ancient engravings on stones were discovered.

Archaeologists study the stones (by The Journal)
Archaeologists study the stones (by The Journal)

Archaeologists believe to have discovered megalithic art on stones uncovered at the Neolithic passage tomb that once existed on the Montpelier Hill, prior to erection of the notorious Hellfire Club in 18th century. The stone bearing the carvings was hiding in plain sight to visitors of the site over the years as is was partially visible and much of it was buried beneath the surface.

Stones with ancient engravings (by The Journal)
Stones with ancient engravings (by The Journal)

When the archaeologists removed the stone from its socket, it split into four fragments due to its fragile state by repeated exposure to moisture and extreme heat from bonfires lit at the spot by campers and visitors over the past. In the light of the autumnal sun archaeologists were able to notice a previously unidentified long curving line on the stone’s surface. It formed concentric circles, a spiral motif said to be often used in major Neolithic passage tombs.

Engravings on the stones (by The Journal)
Engravings on the stones (by The Journal)

The find allowed to seal the date of the tomb to at least 5000 years ago and put in in the grand tradition of sites like Newgrange in Co Meath. The stone was documented and studied through use of photogrammetric methods to expose the extent of the carvings. The slab is now at the National Museum of Ireland for further study and an exciting 3D model of it has been put together by the Discovery Programme – accessible under the following LINK.

(after The Journal)

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