Bronze Age  Indus civilization thrived on seasonal monsoon-fed waters

A recent study revealed that people of the Bronze Age Indus Valley civilisation relied on seasonal monsoon flooding and the rich, water-trapping clays of the old river valley, rather than – in contrary to popular belief – on major glacier-fed rivers. These are now said to have dried up more than 3000 years before the peak of the Indus Valley civilisation’s  development.

Structures pointing to a second capital in Osaka unearthed

Archaeologists unearthed structures dating back more than 1000 years at a site of Higashi-Yuge ruins in Yao, Osaka Prefecture, Japan. These remains offer a hint on the existence of a second capital in Osaka, Yuge-no-miya,  that is known only through eighth-century chronicles.

2300-years-old carpenter's tool unearthed

Archaeologists discovered a well preserved ancient carpenter’s tool – an iron “yariganna” cutting chisel, at the Yokaichijikata ruins in Komatsu, Ishikawa province, Japan. The tool is believed to be 2300 years old.