Isotope study reveals dietary habits of Neanderthals

Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the bones of early humans from the Buran Kaya caves on the Crimean Peninsula, Russia-occupied Ukraine, and the locally present potential prey animals such as Saiga, horses, and deer, revealed that early modern humans consumed more plants than Neanderthals but ate very little fish.

Origins of Minoans and Mycenaeans revealed by DNA analysis

Researchers analysing the DNA of members of Europe’s first literate Bronze Age societies of Minoans (c. 2600 to 1100 BC) and Mycenaeans (c. 1700 to 1050 BC), revealed the origins of these populations. It turned out that ancestors of both civilisations were populations from Neolithic Western Anatolia and Greece, and that Minoans had deep roots in the Aegean.

Bronze Age box uncovered in Swiss Alps

Archaeologists discovered a Bronze Age wooden container in an ice patch at an altitude of at 2650 metres at Lötschberg mountain in the Swiss Alps. Analysis of the biomarkers from the food residue shed light on spread and exploitation of cereal grains in Prehistoric Europe.

Burial pit with 48 Black Death victims uncovered

Excavations near near Immingham in Lincolnshire, United Kingdom, revealed a mass burial pit of victims of the Black Death pandemic. Carbon dating shows that the skeletons come from 14th century while DNA tests confirmed presence of the plague bacteria.