Isotope study reveals dietary habits of Neanderthals

Analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the bones of early humans from the Buran Kaya caves on the Crimean Peninsula, Russia-occupied Ukraine, and the locally present potential prey animals such as Saiga, horses, and deer, revealed that early modern humans consumed more plants than Neanderthals but ate very little fish.

Bronze Age box uncovered in Swiss Alps

Archaeologists discovered a Bronze Age wooden container in an ice patch at an altitude of at 2650 metres at Lötschberg mountain in the Swiss Alps. Analysis of the biomarkers from the food residue shed light on spread and exploitation of cereal grains in Prehistoric Europe.

Trove of bronze axe heads discovered in Norway

A trove of 3000-year-old weapons containing a large number of bronze axe heads was found late April in a field in the village of Hegra, near Stjørdal, Norway. According to the experts the objects date back to the Late Bronze Age between 1100-500 BC.

More data of Homo floresiensis' origin

Comprehensive study of the bones of Homo floresiensis (dubbed “the hobbit”), discovered on the Indonesian island of Flores, Indonesia, in 2003, revealed that the species of tiny human most likely evolved from an ancestor in Africa and not from Homo erectus as has been widely believed.