Stone fort of Caherconnell Cashel under archaeological investigation

A team of archaeologists are excavating the Caherconnell Cashel site in Ireland. Unearthed artefacts testify to a long Medieval period occupation at the site, lasting from 10th to 15th or 16th century AD. The cashel is a drystone (no mortar) enclosure: a 4m-high limestone wall enclosing a circular area that contained dwellings, the enclosure having an east-facing entrance.

Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)
Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)

The excavations in the interior of the structure have already revealed evidence for a series of occupation and building phases that indicate a long period of use. The artefact include clothes-fastening pins of bone, iron and bronze; iron shears; knives and other tools; whetstones and quernstones; glass and amber beads; a silver finger ring; iron and bronze buckles; a bronze tuning peg from a harp; iron arrowheads; intricately carved bone hair combs, and plenty of animal remains.

Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)
Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)

The finds are helping to reveal the lifestyle of these people, who lived in a time when the Anglo-Normans invaded Ireland in the 12th century AD. The archaeologists hope that the results of the excavation will help unfold a new chapter in the ongoing search for the unwritten history of the Gaelic people who inhabited Ireland.

Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)
Excavations at Caherconnell Cashel (by Popular Archaeology)

(after Popular Archaeology)

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