Prehistoric Cochno Stone with mysterious marking unearthed

Archaeologists unearthed a stone panel in Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, called the Cochno Stone which contains among others cup and ring markings made in Neolithic and Bronze Age. The find dates back even to 3000 BC.

Surface of the stone (by BBC News)
Surface of the stone (by BBC News)

The stone is located near a housing estate and was previously known but remained buried for protection since 1965 until a team of archaeologists from Glasgow University unearthed it. The experts aim at using 3D-imaging technology to make a detailed digital record of the site.

Markings on the Cochno Stone (by BBC News)
Markings on the Cochno Stone (by BBC News)

The find is said to be the biggest and one of the most important Neolithic art panels in Europe. It bears cup and ring marks that are extensive. It also is covered by more modern graffiti. This signs of vandalism were one of the reasons for burying the stone in 1965 to protect it from further damage.

Modern graffiti on the stone (by BBC News)
Modern graffiti on the stone (by BBC News)

The archaeologists plan to produce a life-size copy of the 8m by 13m stone using the recorded digital data and historical sources, including the graffiti as well as the prehistoric surface.

Excavations at the Cochno Stone site (by BBC News)
Excavations at the Cochno Stone site (by BBC News)

(after BBC News)

 

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