Previously unknown burial mounds discovered in north-western Poland

Archaeologists are conducting excavations at a complex of burial mounds, discovered near Czaplinek, north-western Poland. The site seems to consist of burial mounds and stone circles.

The mound under investigation near Czaplinek (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)
The mound under investigation near Czaplinek (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)

The archaeologists from Museum in Koszalin conducted research in the area, discovering previously unknown mounds and a Medieval open settlement so far. At first it was impossible to determine the age of the mounds but the artefacts unearthed during excavations point to the Roman period, between 1st and 3rd century AD.

Excavations of the site (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)
Excavations of the site (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)

The archaeologists discovered so far an urn burial. Burnt remains were placed in a pottery urn together with personal equipment and placed within the mound. The artefacts found inside the urn, a bone pin, bronze buckle and clay spindle whorl, indicate that it contains remains of a woman.

First artefacts from the site (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)
First artefacts from the site (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)

The site consists of burial mounds that are enclosed with stone rings, in which larger ones are connected with a row of smaller. Most of the large stones are overturned or shattered but it is possible to identify their initial location. Archaeological fieldwork reveals the whole layout if the stone ring. In the centre a large stone was also placed. So far three stone circles of that kind were located. The archaeologists believe such places were used for both ritual burials and places of religious gatherings or even places of sacrifices for the Iron Age communities.

One of the mounds (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)
One of the mounds (by Muzeum w Koszalinie)

(after Muzeum w Koszalinie)

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