Discovery of a well-preserved Egyptian sarcophagus

Archaeologists discovered a previously undisturbed tomb in Luxor, south Egypt. The tomb contained a sarcophagus in a very good state of preservation.

The sarcophagus (by AFP)
The sarcophagus (by AFP)

According to the archaeologists leading the excavations, Myriam Seco Alvarez, the tomb dates to between 1075-664 BC. The sarcophagus was decorated with many colourful decorations, recalling religious symbols from ancient Egypt, including the goddesses Isis and Nepthtys, displaying their wings; and the Four Sons of Horus.

Detail of the sarcophagus (by AFP)
Detail of the sarcophagus (by AFP)

The tomb is said to belong to the nobleman called Amenrenef, who was a servant of the royal household of the warrior king Thutmose III. Within the sarcophagus a mummy, bound with linen and plaster was found. The tomb itself was found in the vicinity of a temple from the era of the said fourth-millennium Pharaoh  Thutmose III.

The entrance of the tomb in Luxor (by AFP)
The entrance of the tomb in Luxor (by AFP)

(after 9News & AFP)

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