Ancient air conditioning found in Kuwait

An interior cooling system of a house, dated to 7th-9th century has been found by Slovak archaeologists during excavations at the al-Kusur settlement on the Failaka Island in the Persian Gulf (Kuwait). Archaeologists from the Archaeological Instituteof the Slovak Academy of Sciences studied and documented the largest inhabitable settlement building at the site.

Excavations at the site (by The Slovak Spectator)
Excavations at the site (by The Slovak Spectator)

As a result, a well-preserved palace dating from the 7th-8th century was discovered, representing an advanced architecture, traditionally built from unfired bricks on stone foundations.

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Excavations at the site (by The Slovak Spectator)

Also, a stone tower with a comprehensive system of canals was uncovered nearby. A unique so-called windcatch-tower, utilised an ingenious interior cooling system based on the flow of air, caught by openings in the tower superstructure. This energy-efficient ventilation system used to be prevalent mostly in Iran and the Middle East, later in North Africa.

Remains of an air-conditioning system found in Kuwait (by The Slovak Spectator)
Remains of an air-conditioning system found in Kuwait (by The Slovak Spectator)

(after The Slovak Spectator)

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