Ancient jewellery made of painted human jawbone found

During archaeological works at an ancient residential complex at the site of Dainzú-Macuilxóchitl in the Oaxaca Valley (southern Mexico) unique artefacts were discovered. Painted human mandibles were found that may have been worn like necklace pendants. They date back ca. 1300 years.

Construction of new subway line uncover Roman buildings

The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city’s new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes.

Ancient treasure found as cargo in ancient Cesarea's harbor

Divers discovered in the port of ancient Caesarea (modern Israel) a cargo of a merchant ship that sank there during the Late Roman period, about 1,600 years ago. Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted research at the site and found numerous objects such as iron anchors, remains of wooden anchors and items that were used in the construction and running of the sailing vessel.

A virtual museum of a prehistoric fort

The prehistoric fort in Chodlik (lubelskie voivodeship) in eastern Poland received its virtual museum after the archaeologists created multimedia platform for the broad audience. The project has been undertaken by the Scientific Society of Polish Archaeologists in co-operation with the Museum Nadwiślańskie in Kazimierz Dolny and the local government of Karczmiska municipality.

Tiny Egyptian coffin reveals a mummified foetus

Computer Tomography analysis of a coffin excavated at Giza in 1907 by the British School of Archaeology revealed the youngest ever example of a mummified human foetus from Ancient Egypt. According to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge the pregnancy lasted for 16 to 18 weeks.

Ancient air conditioning found in Kuwait

An interior cooling system of a house, dated to 7th-9th century has been found by Slovak archaeologists during excavations at the al-Kusur settlement on the Failaka Island in the Persian Gulf (Kuwait). Archaeologists from the Archaeological Instituteof the Slovak Academy of Sciences studied and documented the largest inhabitable settlement building at the site.

Stone tablet reveals 2000-year-old racing rules

A 2,000-year-old tablet was uncovered in the Beyşehir district of the Central Anatolian province of Konya (Turkey).  Being part of the Lukuyanus Monument, the tablet was apparently built to honour a jockey named Lukuyanus, who died at an early age in the Pisidian era. The discovery was made on the site of an ancient hippodrome.